Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.288842
Title: Technics and deconstruction
Author: Roberts, B. L.
Awarding Body: University of Sussex
Current Institution: University of Sussex
Date of Award: 2003
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Abstract:
This thesis explores the question of technicity in relation to deconstruction. This question of `technics' is first explored in relation to Marx's analysis of the commodity. I examine Jean-Joseph Goux's attempt in Economie et Symbolique to extend the four-stage development of the commodity fetish to all forms of symbolic value including that of the linguistic sign. Here what I demonstrate is that Derrida's understanding of arche-writing, far from representing a `material restitution' of the sign as Goux hopes, in fact represents a process of exteriorisation that is irreducibly as ideal as it is material. This `originary technicity' of the sign then helps to explicate the `technical life' of the commodity as outlined by Derrida in Specters of Marx. Secondly, I examine Bernard Stiegler's influential recent work Technics and Time which attempts to generalise a technicity understood as the `prosthesis of the human' to a general theory of `inorganic organised matter', or an evolutionary technics which Stiegler calls epiphylogenesis. Here I analyse in some detail the logic of Stiegler's argument before moving on to query some of the basic assumptions in his reading of Derrida and Heidegger. Finally, I investigate the question of technicity in relation to the politics of deconstruction. Here I explore critically Richard Beardsworth's recent claims that there are two political legacies of Derrida's work, the one building on Derrida's thoughts around original technicity (Stiegler's route), the other concerned with a more religious or literary thinking of the `promise
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.288842  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Technicity Philosophy Religion Literature Mass media Performing arts Political science Public administration
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