Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS:
Title: Some phenomenological aspects of string and M theory compactifications
Author: Morris, Stephen.
Awarding Body: University of Sussex
Current Institution: University of Sussex
Date of Award: 2003
Availability of Full Text:
Access through EThOS:
String theory remains the most popular paradigm for the unification of gravity and quantum field theory, but it has had little success in producing predictions that can be verified in experiments. One outstanding problem is the presence of a large number of physically inequivalent vacua. At low energies these are parameterised by scalar fields called moduli. This thesis will examine two aspects of their phenomenology. Firstly we study the possibility of spontaneous CP violation in string models with the dilaton field -a modulus determining the gauge coupling - stabilised at a phenomenologically acceptable value. We consider three mechanisms to stabilise the dilaton: multiple gaugino condensates, a nonperturbative Kähler potential, and a superpotential based on S-duality, and analyze consequent CP phases in the soft SUSY breaking terms. These models are unable to produce a realistic phenomenology, typically over-producing EDMs and giving a CKM phase that is too small, unless the potential controlling the moduli stabilisation is allowed to contain singularities. Secondly we compute the moduli Kähler potential for M-theory on a compact manifold of G2 holonomy in a large radius approximation. Our method relies on an explicit G2 structure with small torsion, its periods and the calculation of the approximate volume of the manifold. As a verification of our result, some of the components of the Kibler metric are computed directly by integration over harmonic forms. We also discuss the modification of our result in the presence of co-dimension four singularities and derive the gauge-kinetic functions for the massless gauge fields that arise in this case
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID:  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Theoretical physics Physics Particles (Nuclear physics) Nuclear reactions