Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.287707
Title: The influence of geology on small scale spatial changes in stream water chemistry
Author: Staines, Russell
Awarding Body: University of Aberdeen
Current Institution: University of Aberdeen
Date of Award: 1998
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Abstract:
The influence of geology on small scale spatial changes in stream water chemistry has been investigated in the Allt Fileachaidh and Allt an t-Sneachda catchments, in Glen Muick (NE Scotland), using both field and laboratory studies. This research was carried out with the specific aim of investigating the use of small scale spatial changes in stream water chemistry as a geological/geochemical mapping tool. For this purpose, the use of stream water has been compared to the use of stream sediment, a more traditional geochemical sample medium. In addition, the transferability of the method has been investigated in a geologically well exposed Arctic environment by a study of three catchments in Svalbard. The major findings of the research are as follows: (i) In the Allt Fileachaidh and Allt an t-Sneachda catchments, small scale downstream changes in stream water chemistry, in particular the concentrations of Si, Ca, Mg, Na, K and inorganic C, were associated with changes in the underlying geology; (ii) Mineralogical composition, and not bulk lithochemistry, was the most important feature of the bedrock in Glen Muick, in relation to spatial changes in stream water chemistry; (iii) In the upper catchment areas in Glen Muick, both small scale spatial changes in stream water chemistry and stream sediment chemistry were associated with changes in the underlying geology. In lower catchment areas, the usefulness of both techniques for indicating the position of geological boundaries, was limited; (iv) In a simulated laboratory weathering experiment, the four main bedrock lithologies in the Glen Muick catchments, were each shown to have a distinct chemical weathering signature, which correlated with chemical features in stream water; (v) In comparison to NE Scotland, lithological changes within catchments in Svalbard are unrelated to small scale downstream changes in stream water chemistry, due to the physical conditions which prevail in the high Arctic, such as permafrost and the abundance of suspended rock flour in stream water.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.287707  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Geology Geology Mineralogy Sedimentology Geochemistry
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