Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.279779
Title: Carboniferous quartz arenites and ganisters of the Northern Pennines
Author: Percival, C. J.
Awarding Body: Durham University
Current Institution: Durham University
Date of Award: 1981
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Abstract:
The Carboniferous succession of the Northern Pennines contains a wide variety of texturally and mineralogically mature quartz arenites. These occur interbedded with less mature sandstones, shales and limestones and are common in strata. of Brigantian to Westphalian A age. The majority of these quartz arenites appear to have achieved their mature, stable mineralogy by reworking of less mature fluvial and deltaic sands in high energy shallowmarine to shoreline environments. These quartz arenites are up to approximately 18m. thick, and are particularly common in Brigantian and Namurian E1 and E2 deposits on the Alston Block. This suggests that during this period sediment supply and subsidence on the Alston Block was often sufficiently low to enable reworking to take place in the shallowmarine to shoreline environments that commonly existed. Preserved sedimentary structures and stratification sequences suggest that the quartz arenites principally formed in barrier island, beach and storm-dominated shallow-marine environments. The remaining quartz arenites are generally <1 m. thick, irregularly based deposits penetrated by rootlets. They are common in the lowermost Westphalian A strata., and appear to have formed pedogenically by the breakdown of unstable mineral grains and downward mechanical eluviation of clays and other alteration products. These deposits represent the fossilized A2 -horizon of podzols and podzolic soils. Quartz arenites formed in this-manner-which--contain >95% quartz constitute the true ganisters.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.279779  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Geology Geology Mineralogy Sedimentology
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