Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.273313
Title: Theory of planned behaviour, skin care & pressure sores following spinal cord injury
Author: Sheppard, Ruth.
Awarding Body: Open University
Current Institution: Open University
Date of Award: 2002
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Abstract:
Objectives: To use the theory of plannedb ehaviourt o explore factors associatedw ith performing skin care behaviours and the occurrence of pressure sores in people with spinal cord injury. Design: A within-group cross-sectional design was used to assess 59 people with spinal cord injury living in the community. A sample returned a repeat assessment allowing a longitudinal examination of the relationship between intention and actual behaviour. Methods: A measure was developed in accordance with the theory of planned behaviour guidelines through interviews with people with spinal cord injury. Measures of mood and knowledge of skin-care behaviours were also included. Results: The theory of planned behaviour components, mood and knowledge of skincare behaviours were helpful in predicting intention, skin care behaviour and occurrence of pressure sores. Demographic and disease factors also helped to identify people at increased risk of performing less skin-care behaviour or developing a pressure sore. Overall, past behaviour and indirect perceived control and past behaviour and age were particularly important predictors of pressure relief and skin checking intention respectively. Conclusions: Psychosocial factors, including the theory of planned behaviour components, were useful in understanding adherence to skin care behaviours and the occurrence of pressure sores. Overall the combination of past behaviour and indirect perceived control, and past behaviour and age were particularly important predictors of pressure relief intention and skin checking intention respectively. The clinical and theoretical implications of these findings are considered and suggestions for future research are outlined.
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (D.Clin.Psychol.)-Open University, Jul 2002. Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.273313  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Psychology Psychology Medicine
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