Use this URL to cite or link to this record in EThOS: http://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.265363
Title: The hidden landscaped of the Holocaust in late twentieth century Britain.
Author: Cooke, Steven John.
Awarding Body: University of Bristol
Current Institution: University of Bristol
Date of Award: 1998
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Abstract:
This thesis investigates the memorial landscapes of the Holocaust in late twentieth century Britain. By using a variety of methodological and theoretical techniques it reconstructs the biography of the mnemonic sites that seek to represent the Holocaust in the British landscape. It argues that these landscapes are structured by a number of discourses which construct the Holocaust as apart from the histories and the geographies of British people. The first is the heroic myths that pervade British society about the role of Britain during the Second World War. The second in the ontologies of Anglo-Jewry within the assimilationist framework of British society. This has produced landscapes which can be described as 'hidden'. The mnemonic sites in Britain that commemorate the Holocaust are in 'out-of-the-way' places and spaces which in turn reinforces the notion that the Holocaust is not something that the people of Britain need to consider as relevant to contemporary society. It also examines the way in which the memorial's relationship with its surrounding location is crucially important in the making of meaning, both for the memorial itself and for the surrounding rural or urban fabric. It argues that an active engagement with the landscape can be used to reconnect the spatial and temporal histories of particular mnemonic sites to explore the way in which the Holocaust is relevant to past and contemporary British social relations
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
EThOS ID: uk.bl.ethos.265363  DOI: Not available
Keywords: Monuments; Memorials; Jewish community; Britain History
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