Title: The interpretation of the piano music of Alexander Skryabin up to Sonata No. 4, Op. 30
Author: Ward, Marie
Awarding Body: Kingston University
Current Institution: Kingston University
Date of Award: 2001
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EThOS Persistent ID: uk.bl.ethos.555014 
Supervisor: Not available Sponsor: Not available
Qualification Name: Thesis (Ph.D.) Qualification Level: Doctoral
Abstract:
This thesis is presented in three parts. The first chapter outlines how Fryderyck Chopin's music had a bearing on that of Alexander Skryabin through his bel canto writing for the piano. In addition, the presence of aspects of the bel canto style in Skryabin's early piano (up to Sonata No.4, Op. 30), albeit in a less concentrated form than in Chopin's music, are examined. Parallels are also presented between Skryabin, Chopin and actual bel canto composerssuch as Gioacchino Rossini. The second chapter equates aspects of Skryabin's style with his rubato style, in particular those with connections with the bel canto style. This rubato style is assessed in terms of its proximity to the Romantic style of playing in vogue durIng Skryabin's lifetime. The chapter also briefly investigates whether there are similarities with Chopin's compositional and performance style and assesses Skryabin's approach to rubato in his own performance. In addition, internal evidence is taken from the compositions themselves for information on how to approach rubato in a performance of Skryabin's works. The third chapter comprises a comparison of editions in the hope that a notationally-informed performance may lead to a higher level of authenticity in these rarely performed works. In addition, reference is made to recordings by Skryabin and his contemporaries, which are compared with modern recordings, including one which purports to be based on the composer's own style of playing. In this way, it is hoped that a performer approaching a modern interpretation of the works may be historically aware of the styles of performance which Skryabin would have heard and expected, and may equate those with, and integrate that knowledge into, a performance which is acceptable to the modern ear.
Keywords: Music
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